An Evening with Marc Lamont Hill

Words by: Darilyn Cotton

Ruby Diamond auditorium filled with students from Florida A&M University and Florida State University Tuesday night to continue celebrating the life and legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.  FSU held their 29th annual MLK week celebration with the theme “Unfolding the Dream.”

From the beginning of his speech, guest speaker Marc Lamont Hill, challenged students to connect to the “real” Dr. King and continue his legacy. “King’s tradition recognizes progress and growth”, said Hill, “but we can never stop climbing.”

To be successful in unfolding Dr. King’s dream, Hill spoke about several key points that students need to do to keep Dr. King’s traditions alive. He talked about understanding the interconnectedness of our struggles today and the struggles of Dr. King, how to listen carefully and how to work together.

Hill mentioned that to move forward with Dr. King’s dream we [African Americans] have to understand the interconnectedness of our struggles. The same way King had a vision about a better world this generation has to have a dream and envision a better world than the one we live in today.

“We can look at a broad scope, but we need to narrow it down to look at how problems are connected and find ways to help”, said Amaya Mann, a FAMU student.

Next, Hill spoke about the importance of listening. During his life King meet with all types of people and heard what they had to say, whether he agreed with them or not, he listened. “You can’t just listen to people on the right side you have to listen to people on the left side too”, said Hill. You have to challenge other people’s thoughts.

The next topic of discussion was how to work together. Hill stressed the idea that we have to work together to complete our goals as a group of people. Everyone won’t be able to be the president of their own organization, you can join an organization and help further the goals of that organization. “You can’t do your work over here and I do my work over there, we must work together”, said Hill.

Before dropping the microphone at the end of his speech Hill told the audience if they didn’t hear anything else he said make sure they heard this: The biggest problem in the world is there are too many people who don’t do anything.

“I want you to commit to do something when you leave here”, said Hill. After hearing Hill’s challenge FAMU student Kimberly Rolle says she has already been involved with movements that will help the black community and she will continue in that fight.

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